dekar

How Kevin Grevioux got his comic “I, Frankenstein” made into a movie

Written by on    

Kevin Grevioux wrote and stars in his new movie “I, Frankenstein” which will be released in 3D, through Lionsgate, January 24, 2014. Set in a dystopic present where vigilant gargoyles and ferocious demons rage in a battle for ultimate power, Victor Frankenstein’s creation Adam (Aaron Eckhart) finds himself caught in the middle as both sides race to discover the secret to his immortality. Kevin has always been involved with cool projects, my favorite was his voiceover role as Black Beetle in the new Young Justice animated series. But his new movie not only sets the stage for a new series, but he also provides a blueprint for upcoming writers and filmmakers.

Illustrate Your Ideas

Kevin pitched his idea for the movie to studios and producers, but no one understood the story he was trying to tell. He didn’t have the script at first, because most writers only go forward with a script once studios like the idea. He believed in his idea so much he went ahead and wrote the script anyway, knowing he would eventually win people over. He decided to create a graphic novel to illustrate and help people visualize his story. Once he did that, people loved the idea. He suggests all upcoming writers do the same.

Learn To Do It All Yourself

When asked what young filmmakers need to know. His advice was to learn how to write, and learn how to draw. Since Kevin knew how to write he was able to have more control over his IP and, bring more to the negotiating table. It would also be cheaper. Since Kevin didn’t know how to draw, he said he had to pay someone to help him with his I, Frankenstein visuals.

I-Frankenstein-Comic-Book

Don’t Listen To Haters

One of the themes of the movie is knowing who to listen to. Kevin tells us how Victor Frankenstein in the movie has to choose between man, monster, or both. People will tell you what to do, and how to do it. But, you have to use your own judgement at the end of the day. Kevin also expressed how many people told him his ideas were stupid and laughing at them. “They aint laughing now” he tells us.

Make Characters That You Relate To

Kevin made Victor Frankenstein a person that was misunderstood. He related to the character personally, as he has been misunderstood heavily, especially convincing people this story was worth telling. He also, compared the struggle of Frankenstein to the struggle he faced as a black man in America.

The biggest message in the movie I, Frankenstein is to know who you are. And until you figure that out, go see the movie in theaters on January 24th.

About The Author
Leave A Comment