Interviews TV

Death, Mystery and Making History: An Interview with Lost On Everest’s Renan Ozturk

On June 30th, National Geographic will air one of its most thrilling documentaries about the tragic and mysterious longstanding tradition of exploring the forbidden mountain, Mount Everest.

Lost on Everest attempts to solve one of the mountain’s and the climbing community biggest mysteries, what happened to George Mallory and his climbing partner Sandy Irvine? Did they get lost? Was there an accident? Or was it murder?

In 1924, British mountaineer George Mallory and his climbing partner Sandy Irvine attempted to become the first men to reach the highest peak. Last seen just hundreds of feet from the highest peak, both men were never seen again. However they took a camera with them that could provide the keys to solving one of the oldest mysteries of the mountain and finally answer if they truly were the first men to reach the top of the mountain, something no man is known to have done until 1953.

George Mallory’s body was discovered in 1999, well preserved because of cold conditions but the camera and the body of Sandy Irvine are the remaining pieces to be discovered in this mystery and the premise of this expedition.

With over one hundred frozen dead bodies across the Everest terrain there have been reports from climbers of seeing a body that matches a description of Sandy Irvine. Could it really be him?

Equipped with modern technology and drones, National Geographic takes viewers on a journey to retrace the steps of George Mallory and Sandy Irvine to answer whether they actually reached the topAlong for the journey is National Geographic’s expedition climber Renan Ozturk who spoke with us about the importance of this discovery and why he joined the project.

Lost on Everest at 9:00 pm ET on National Geographic.

Check out our interview below.

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